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Climate change is impacting California tree crop farms

Rising temperatures appear to be reducing the number of hours tree crops in the San Joaquin Valley are subjected to chill during the winter, a critical factor in producing a profitable yield, reported Ezra David Romero on Valley Public Radio, KVPR-FM.

Pistachios, for example, require temperatures between 32 and 45 degrees for about 700 hours each winter, but for the past four years have had less than 500 chill hours.

UC Davis researcher Hyunok Lee recently published a study about climate change impacts on agriculture in UC Agriculture and Natural Resources' peer-reviewed journal California Agriculture. The study found that winter temperatures are increasing more than any other time of year. Her modeling looks at the year 2050 in Yolo County.

“Our agriculture will continue,” Lee said. “But if you look at . . . like 20 years or 30 years. The pattern may change a little bit, crops may move a little bit north.”

Insufficient chill hours can delay the opening of leaf and flower buds in crops such as walnuts, which may result in a smaller yield. (Photo: Will Suckow))

 

Romero spoke to UC Cooperative Extension farm advisor Craig Kallsen, who holds the UC Cooperative Extension Presidential Chair for Tree Nut Genetics. Kallsen is conducting trials aimed at finding pistachio varieties with novel nut, tree growth and yield characteristics, and varieties that produce a high yield even under low-chill conditions.

"We're trying to use the other species of pistachios actually to see if we can come up with something that has a low chill requirement. It's pretty hypothetical at this stage,” Kallsen told Romero. “We made quite a few crosses this spring and we actually hope to put a trial in a low chill area.”

David Doll, UC Cooperative Extension farm advisor in Merced County, is studying other tactics to improve winter chill, such as using overhead sprinklers to cool the trees and painting them white with liquid clay to reflect sunlight.

"So this is something that could impact a lot of farmers over the next 10, 20, 30 to 40 years,” Doll said. “And in fact it's already impacting farmers on random given years across the state."

 

Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 at 9:04 AM

A foreboding fungus is threatening orchards in the San Joaquin Valley

A fallen almond tree that was weakened by Ganoderma fungus. (Photo: Bob Johnson)
When an almond tree keels over in a mature orchard, it could be a sign of something ominous. UC scientists are tracking a fungal infection in San Joaquin Valley almond trees that can cost farmers hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost production.

Ganoderma's been around for a long time,” said Bob Johnson, a UC Davis graduate student who is leading the study for his doctoral thesis under the direction of UC Davis plant pathologist Dave Rizzo. “The tree failure we're seeing may be that we've now reached such a density of almonds here, that the problem just seems more widespread. Or it may be a new Ganoderma species in our state.”

The UC Cooperative Extension nut crops advisor in Fresno County, Mae Culumber, speculated that air quality regulations prohibiting the burning of orchard prunings may have allowed fungi to grow in slash piles in agricultural areas. However, the cause of the problem is currently unknown.

Ganoderma is a genus of fungi with about 80 known species. It is typically considered a forest pest in the U.S. and, in terms of agriculture, poses problems for the palm tree industry in the tropics. The Ganoderma now being found in California agriculture grows in the living heartwood of almond, peach and other stone fruit trees. The presence of the fungus doesn't appear to impact tree production. The only outward sign is development of rather large shelf-like mushrooms on the trunks called conks.

“Once you see conks on the tree, it is essentially dying from the inside out,” Johnson said. “The conks release trillions of spores which wind and water move through the orchard and to neighboring orchards. It's next to impossible to stop the spread.”

A farmer in Hanford recently pulled out and destroyed every tree in his 120-acre orchard because of Ganoderma infection.

“This was a 9- or 10-year-old orchard, just when the grower starts making money after investing in its establishment,” Johnson said. “Instead, his trees were just falling down right and left and he pulled out the orchard.”

Culumber called Johnson out to a Fresno County orchard where the farmer is starting to lose trees.

“In his orchard, every fifth tree has a massively sporulating conk,” Johnson said. “Growers see the conks, but they don't realize they are the infectious part of Ganoderma fungi.”

Culumber said other orchards in the area also have active conks.

“I know of at least two locations within a square mile,” she said. “One is very progressed, and I talked with another grower with early symptoms.”

Johnson is calling on farmers to contact him if their trees have fallen over due to decay in the trunk or if they have seen conks on tree trunks.

“We need to understand the distribution and incidence of Ganoderma infection in order to develop management strategies that will limit the impact of this disease,” Johnson said.

To report trees potentially infected with Ganoderma, contact Johnson at (530) 302-6301 or bobjohnson@ucdavis.edu.

A collage of tree trunks with Ganoderma conks. Once the conks appear, the tree is dying from the inside out. (Photos: Bob Johnson)
Posted on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 9:40 AM

California governor sets aside funds to promote soil health

California Gov. Jerry Brown has included $7.5 million in the 2017-18 budget to launch the Healthy Soils Initiative, reported Bob Gore in a commentary on Techwire.net.

The story said CDFA secretary Karen Ross announced the development at a recent meeting, saying "We're starting from the ground up."

Carlos Suarez of the U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service was also quoted in Gore's story. Suarez said the funding puts "soils back into the forefront of agriculture. Feeding the people is the real issue. We have to take care of our soils."

Jenny Lester Moffitt, CDFA deputy secretary and walnut farmer, is the point person for the Governor's Healthy Soils Initiative, which formally starts Jan. 19. Moffitt said the $7.5 million will fund research and demonstration projects so the "UC Ag and Natural Resources engine will rev up."

California's Healthy Soils Action Plan notes that the new initiative will "provide boots-on-the-ground" research, education and technical support to the agricultural industry.

"Utilizing partners such as Natural Resource Conservation Services, University of California Cooperative Extension and Resource Conservation Districts, (the initiative will) enhance and expand technical assistance and outreach activities to distribute new and existing management practice information to farmers and ranchers," the action plan says on Page 5.

Boots on the ground where a former almond orchard stood. The shredded trees will be incorporated into the soil to build soil organic matter.
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2017 at 2:15 PM

Collaboration is the key to collective decision-making

When people don't think about the impact of their decision-making on others, it can ultimately lead to tragedy - the tragedy of the commons, said UC Agriculture and Natural Resources researcher Mark Lubell during an interview on Jefferson Public Radio. Lubell, director of the Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior at UC Davis, studies human decision-making in the context of the environment.

"People think about what happens on their private land and make their private decisions, but they don't think about how their private decisions affect others," Lubell said. "You see this all the time with human decision-making."

An example he uses with his students is how they and their roommates manage their shared kitchens.

"When one person's dishes pile up, it impacts the others," Lubell said. "I ask how they would make rules to solve the problem."

Lubell said the parties need to collectively develop a policy that is mutually beneficial.

"If we didn't have that capacity, we would be in big trouble," Lubell said.

Cooperation tends to be the norm, however the media is more likely to cover cases of conflict, so they tend to get more attention.

UC researcher Mark Lubell uses dirty dishes in a shared kitchen as an example of how one person's decisions impacts others.
Posted on Thursday, January 12, 2017 at 11:10 AM

In a new study biochar helps yields, but only in the short term

Adding biochar to a farm's field is an irreversible decision, so understanding its long-term impacts is essential for farmers to make informed decisions.

Biochar, a charcoal created from organic materials burned at high temperatures and added as a soil amendment, has been shown to increase pH and soil fertility in areas with more weathered, acidic soils, like the tropics. But a new study shows its impact on productive soils like those in California's Central Valley may be quite different.

Findings from a four year study conducted at the Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility at UC Davis showed an increase in corn yields in the second year after adding biochar, but through different means than have been observed elsewhere.

The study, published in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, used biochar made from walnut shells, cooked at 900°C from an orchard in Winters, Calif. Biochar was added to a plot rotating tomato and corn crops at the Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility at UC Davis, a long-term research facility focused on using farm management practices similar to those used at commercial farms.

Ph.D. candidate Deirdre Griffin at a research plot at the Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility

Short term boosts in yields

“A lot of biochar lab studies look at intricacies of how biochar changes nitrogen cycling, so I was very focused on looking at that in the field,” says Deirdre Griffin, Ph.D. candidate in soils and biogeochemistry at UC Davis and lead author of the study.

But instead of a change in the nitrogen cycle, the biochar affected potassium, phosphorous, and calcium in the soil, causing an 8 percent increase in corn yields. The increase, however, didn't happen until the second year after application.

That delay may be due to biochar's hydrophobic nature — it repels water when first in the ground, and may only start to interact with soil after significant time. After year two, the yield benefits of biochar dropped off, and by year four showed no difference compared to plots without biochar.

“The benefits that we saw were from direct fertilization from biochar, in which case growers might be able to see the same boost in yield if they applied a little more fertilizer,” says Griffin. “We didn't see much change in the soil properties that could have more lasting effects. But those things could still be impacted in the coming years as the biochar continues to age.”

To see continued yield increases like these, growers may need to apply biochar regularly, which is not its intended purpose and may pose challenges for growers. Biochar can be dusty, dispersing black soot as it is applied. Growers can wet biochar to limit its dust, but without overcoming that challenge, repeatedly adding biochar to the soil may limit its appeal.

Many biochars, many functions

Like compost, different biochars act differently in the soil. Different sources (type of shell or other organic material), treated at different temperatures, and added to varying soil types can all impact what benefits a grower may see from biochar.

Carbon sequestration, not included in this study, is broadly understood as a benefit of biochar, and some research is looking at its potential to pull heavy metals from soils.

“When biochar research started flourishing, people started seeing positive results in tropical systems and got excited about it,” says Griffin. “Because of our soils and agriculture, we don't necessarily see the same benefits in our systems. But every biochar is different, and we need to understand their characteristics, to engineer them for different systems and different purposes. And we're still working to understand that.”

Griffin's study is ongoing and Russell Ranch and will continue to provide insights on biochar's impacts over time.

Having a long-term study that uses realistic farm practices will help build the understanding of the role of biochar in already fertile soils, and have strong data showing how biochar really acts in the long run, so farmers making the irreversible decision to add biochar know exactly what they are investing in.

More information on biochar can be found on the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources' Biochar Blog, the Solution Center for Nutrient Management, and the Biochar Database managed by associate professor Sanjai Parikh at UC Davis.

Posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2017 at 8:47 AM

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