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Bug Squad

Ground-Breaking Research: Sex Pheromone of Asian Citrus Psyllid Discovered

This is the Asian citrus psyllid, a mottled brown insect about 3 to 4 millimeters long, or about the size of an aphid. Widespread throughout Southern California, it is now found in 26 of the state's 58 counties. (CDFA Photo)

The Asian citrus psyllid, the most devastating threat to the worldwide citrus industry, may have met its match. In a ground-breaking discovery encompassing six years of research, an international team of scientists led by UC Davis chemical ecologist...

The Beatles Have Nothing on The Beetles

It's the "in" thing. Insects--their beauty, their structure, their diversity--are inspiring noted fashion designers, but those fashion designers are way, way behind the UC Davis Entomology Graduate Students' Association (EGSA). EGSA members are...

Posted on Monday, December 4, 2017 at 4:30 PM

Bumble Bee Braking During a Winter Break

A queen yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, brakes during a winter break in Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You never know what you'll find when you visit a pollinator garden. Take the case of our visit Nov. 12 to the Sonoma Cornerstone, Sonoma, to see the pollinator garden of Kate Frey, an ardent pollinator advocate, world-class garden designer, and...

Of Butterfly Patterns and Genetic Codes

A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, on lantana in Vacaville, Calif. Now researchers at the University of Manitoba have identified the genetic code by which butterflies can assign color patterns to different parts of their wings during development. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Who knew? You've probably watched those colorful painted ladies (Vanessa cardui) fluttering about in your yard, but have you read the newly published research about their wing color patterns and genetic codes? In researching the color patterns and...

Posted on Thursday, November 30, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Lady Beetles: The First Ladies of the Garden Having a Ball

A lady beetle feasts on aphids on a milkweed plant, Gomphocarpus physocarpus, also known as balloon-plant milkweed or hairy balls. Note the spiky hairs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

See those red spots on your milkweed seed pods? Lady beetles (aka ladybugs or "garden heroes") are feasting on aphids. And they're having a ball. We've been watching the critters on our milkweed, Gomphocarpus physocarpus, for the last couple of...

Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 at 4:17 PM

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